Blogger Tips and TricksLatest Tips And TricksBlogger Tricks

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

DISCUSSION: THE NAYSAYERS ON BOSLEY PROPOSAL TO GET FUNDING FOR A REVAMPED 9-1-1 ARE IN THE MINORITY?


The STARK COUNTY POLITICAL REPORT (The Report) has learned that Stark County Commissioner Todd Bosley has received about 67 e-mails as feedback on the Stark County public's reaction to his "Reform 9-1-1 Now" plan (The Report's characterization).

Bosley says that the feedback is more positive than negative with some of it being in the middle.

Bosley further says that for those in the middle or even against the plan, once he explains the details of the plan - then they become more favorable.

Of the 67 Bosley says that about 44 were positive with most the remainder falling in the middle with a few being outright negative.

The question: Are you suprised for the generally favorable take on the Bosley plan?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

http://www.ohio.com/editorial/opinions/35784454.html
AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
Innovative in Stark County
A sales tax increase, yes — as part of making government more effective

Published on Tuesday, Dec 09, 2008


There are about 88,000 units of government in the United States, but only one can run a deficit. In the current economic crisis, that places a premium on bold and creative local leaders willing to take a fresh look at problems and make the tough decisions necessary to cope with limited resources. That's certainly the case in Stark County, arguably the most tax-averse in the state, where commissioners are considering an increase in the sales tax.

The plan, advanced by Todd Bosley, would double the portion of the sales tax for county operations from 0.25 percent to 0.5 percent. The new overall rate, at 6.25 percent, still would be among the lowest in the state. That said, Stark County now has the lowest rate and a long history of tax wars. What is Commissioner Bosley thinking?

Quite a lot, it turns out. About half of the proposed sales tax increase (or about $5.5 million a year) would be directed to countywide 911 and dispatching services, centralizing operations now scattered among 13 centers and costing local governments about $7 million, money they could devote to front-line police and fire personnel. At the same time, a 0.10-mill levy that raises about $600,00 a year for 911 operations would be dropped, saving on property taxes.

More important than saving money, Bosley's plan tackles the potentially deadly deficiency created by multiple emergency dispatching operations: dropped calls or delays caused by disputes over jurisdiction. The countywide emergency system would be designed by emergency service personnel.

The rest of the tax increase would go to keep county government functioning at 2007 levels, hardly an extravagance. The general fund plunged from $58.7 million in 2007 to $56.6 million this year; next year's projections are $52 million to $53 million.

Commissioners Tom Harmon and Jane Vignos are supportive, but want to hear from the public at two hearings this month, on Dec. 22 and 29. Stark County has long scraped by, Harmon noting that further cuts would slice deeply into essential operations such as road patrols by sheriff's deputies.

The modest increase being studied by the commissioners would both preserve and improve vital public services, with Stark County residents shouldering just 70 percent of the increased tax burden. The public should voice its support this month for such an innovative approach.

There are about 88,000 units of government in the United States, but only one can run a deficit. In the current economic crisis, that places a premium on bold and creative local leaders willing to take a fresh look at problems and make the tough decisions necessary to cope with limited resources. That's certainly the case in Stark County, arguably the most tax-averse in the state, where commissioners are considering an increase in the sales tax.

The plan, advanced by Todd Bosley, would double the portion of the sales tax for county operations from 0.25 percent to 0.5 percent. The new overall rate, at 6.25 percent, still would be among the lowest in the state. That said, Stark County now has the lowest rate and a long history of tax wars. What is Commissioner Bosley thinking?

Quite a lot, it turns out. About half of the proposed sales tax increase (or about $5.5 million a year) would be directed to countywide 911 and dispatching services, centralizing operations now scattered among 13 centers and costing local governments about $7 million, money they could devote to front-line police and fire personnel. At the same time, a 0.10-mill levy that raises about $600,00 a year for 911 operations would be dropped, saving on property taxes.

More important than saving money, Bosley's plan tackles the potentially deadly deficiency created by multiple emergency dispatching operations: dropped calls or delays caused by disputes over jurisdiction. The countywide emergency system would be designed by emergency service personnel.

The rest of the tax increase would go to keep county government functioning at 2007 levels, hardly an extravagance. The general fund plunged from $58.7 million in 2007 to $56.6 million this year; next year's projections are $52 million to $53 million.

Commissioners Tom Harmon and Jane Vignos are supportive, but want to hear from the public at two hearings this month, on Dec. 22 and 29. Stark County has long scraped by, Harmon noting that further cuts would slice deeply into essential operations such as road patrols by sheriff's deputies.

The modest increase being studied by the commissioners would both preserve and improve vital public services, with Stark County residents shouldering just 70 percent of the increased tax burden. The public should voice its support this month for such an innovative approach.

STARK OBSERVATIONS said...

I am TOTALLY against this proposed tax, and I fear will be JAMMED down our throats. It's very easy to say Mr. Bosley has the "support" of the electorate. I counter that comments on the Respository & Independent websites have been running 90%+ NEGATIVE.

If he is so sure the people want this, then put it on the ballot.

The economy is in turmoil we have had to make many personal sacfrifices already, at the home level. As MUST the government.

NO MORE TAXES!! PERIOD!!

Anonymous said...

The link to the Beacon Editorial Endorsing Bosley's plan was to possibly show how norrow the Canton Repository vision is for fixing not just 911 but the fiscal emergency this county will be soon be in. I am sure there si somethiing better you can do with an editorial like that than just place it in the comments section of your blog?

Anonymous said...

http://www.cantonrep.com/communities/canton/x776477246/Without-early-retirements-layoffs-loom-in-Canton
Intersting Story in todays Rep about a 4.3 million dollar deficit the HEaly Administration is facing.

The mayor’s office as a way to help balance the city’s general fund budget next year and erase a projected $1.1 million shortfall.

The buyout program also could help erase part of a projected $3.2 million operating deficit for the 2010 general fund budget, which supports the Police and Fire departments, various city offices, the park department and many other areas.

The 911 Plan could very well take care of a large portion of Canton's projected 3.2 million operating deficit because their dispatching will be funded by the county sales tax and intern will delay or prevent the need to layoff any police or other safty forces.